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Past Domestic Courses

2019

Travel and Tourism

Travel Dates: May 19-22
Instructors: Julia Poynter
Location: Chicago, IL

Course Description

Principles and practices of domestic and international tourism and leisure travel industries including cultural aspects, economic and social dimensions, marketing, and research.


2017

Travel and Tourism

Travel Dates: May 21-24
Instructors: Julia Poynter
Location: Chicago, IL

Course Description

Principles and practices of domestic and international tourism and leisure travel industries including cultural aspects, economic and social dimensions, marketing, and research.


2016

History of Jazz/Rock Music

Travel Dates: May 12-14
Instructors: Larry Barnes
Location: Cleveland, OH

Course Description

Explores the special cross-cultural development of American popular music since 1900. From African and European roots, this music evolves into the blues, New Orleans jazz, swing, the jazz avant-garde, and current jazz styles. The course then considers the ’language of rebellion’ as a seminal factor in the rapid development of Rock to present day. Rock styles presented will include electric blues, rockabilly and the British invasion; acid rock and psychedelic blues; corporate rock, metal, and punk; grunge, rap and industrial; current mainstream and alternative styles; and the development of popular music since the 1990s in response to the internet revolution. Requires library research of special period, topic, style, or artists, as approved by instructor, to result in a formal research document. When taught in May term, students travel to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland to undertake a portion of this research.

Sapient Sapiens

Travel Dates: May 9-23
Instructors: Jack Furlong
Location: Louisville, KY

Course Description

Nonhuman minds are shaped for the wild, yet many are captive-this disconnect generates important questions: Can we ensure that such complex minds are suitably engaged and challenged in captive environments? Do we have an ethical duty to ensure that they are? And, if so, does this duty extend to all species, not just those that look like us (primates) or captivate us (elephants, seals, bears), but those that bore, scare, or annoy us (insects, bats, snakes)? We will spend two weeks at the Louisville Zoo designing cognitively appropriate enrichment for primates, other large gregarious species, and nongregarious species. We will conduct research to explore two questions: Would treating these animals to cognitive challenges allow them to lead more species-typical lives in captivity? And might such enrichments be a way to treat these wild minds more ethically? Approved as an elective in the ENVS minor.


2015

It’s All About the Bike

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Travel Dates: TBA
Instructor: S. Brown
Location: Kentucky

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Communities and universities across the country are investing in creating bike-friendly communities to support active transport as a means to improved health and to reduce our carbon footprint. We will examine the physiological adaptations and health benefits of cycling, how cycling contributes to our efforts to create more sustainable sources of energy and the impact the bike is making on improved access to health care, opportunities for employment and increased gender equity for millions of people in the developing world.

Ape Sapiens

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Travel Dates: TBA
Instructor: J. Furlong
Location: Louisville, KY & Nicholasville, KY

Course Description

We will explore two questions and their interrelation: what is the extent of primate cognitive capacity? And what kind of ethical call should they elicit from humans? Here we rely on an evolutionary and comparative approach to non-human primate cognition. Emphasizing how differences in evolutionary pressures across species lead to differences in cognitive capacities allows us to explore the specific psychological needs of each species. Primate minds are shaped for the wild, but those we will study are captive. That disconnect between wild minds and their captivity generates our major ethical question: how is it possible to treat such complex minds with the appropriate dignity while in captivity? We will spend several days at the Louisville Zoo and the Primate Rescue Center, working with chimpanzees, gorillas, orangutans, siamang, several species of monkeys, and lemurs, designing cognitively appropriate enrichment items for these species and conducting research to explore the effectiveness of our enrichment items. Might such enrichments be a way to treat these wild minds with dignity? This course will be team-taught across two campuses, ours and Transylvania University’s, and is especially recommended for psychology, biology, pre-vet, and philosophy majors. Travel to Louisville Zoo and Primate Rescue Center in Nicholasville, KY