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English Courses

ENG 1074 Perspectives on Literature
An introductory course in literature designed to guide students’ critical thinking about literary works of various kinds, prose, fiction, poetry, and drama. Students will be given practice in discerning the distinctive features of individual texts, while developing their sense of literature’s role in cultural life. Limited to first-year students and sophomores or by permission of instructor. II Humanities

ENG 1124 Introduction to Dramatic Literature
An introduction to the study of dramatic literature. Students will practice critical reading and writing about the major periods and genres of world dramatic literature, from the Greeks to the present. They will also be expected to see 2-3 plays performed locally. Also listed as THEA 1124. II Humanities

ENG 1134 Introduction to Poetry
An introduction to the study of poetry as a verbal art. Students will focus intensely on language and the ways in which poems develop meaning through a complex patterning of linguistic features. Students will also be guided in thinking of poetry’s value in cultural life. Not a creative writing course. Limited to first-year students and sophomores or by permission of instructor. II Humanities

ENG 1144 Intro to Fiction
An introductory course in prose fiction that focuses on the short story as a form, but may also include a novel or two in its syllabus. Students will practice discerning the distinctive features of individual texts, while developing their sense of narrative fiction’s contributions to cultural life. Limited to first-year students and sophomores or by permission of instructor. II Humanities

ENG 1194 Introduction to Film
A study of film as a major contemporary art form. Topics include film technique and aesthetics, the history of motion pictures, and genres. At least one film viewing each week. II Humanities

ENG 1514 Readings for Creative Writers
An introduction to the study and practice of creative writings, open to first- and second-year students. Through close readings of literary works, students will discover elements of the writer’s craft. This course is an apprenticeship in which the skills that go into the composition of an exemplary work of literature are identified, discussed, and finally, practiced by the student. Prerequisite: FYS 1004.

ENG 2004 Studies in Fiction
A study of short fiction and novel-length works by selected writers primarily from the English-speaking world. Examines the intellectual and cultural backgrounds of these selected works of fiction and develops a comprehensive understanding of the literary techniques through which the fiction writer shapes his/her work. Authors studied may include Flannery O’Connor, James Baldwin, Joyce Carol Oates, Toni Morrison, Joseph Conrad, Virginia Woolf, Margaret Atwood, and Gabriel Garcia Marquez. IV

ENG 2074 Fiction Workshop
An introductory study of the conventions that shape fiction combined with extensive practice in using these conventions. Conducted as a workshop, the course will involve regular writing and discussion of the work produced by the student writers themselves. Students wishing to enroll must present satisfactory evidence of motivation and serious interest in creative writing. Standard or CR/NC grading. IV

ENG 2084 Poetry Workshop
An introductory study of the conventions that shape lyric poetry combined with extensive practice in using these conventions. Conducted as a workshop, the course will involve regular writing and discussion of the work produced by the student writers themselves. Students wishing to enroll must present satisfactory evidence of motivation and serious interest in creative writing. May be repeated for credit as long as the topic is different. Standard or CR/NC grading. IV

ENG 2124 Introduction to African Fiction
An introduction to African literature from Anglophone (English-speaking) countries. The course will focus on clarifying forms of narration that attract African writers as well as issues such as the place of intellectuals and narrative art within contemporary African cultures, language and audience, language and politics, and tradition and modernity. The course will be supported by journalistic and video material, as well as series of feature films by African directors. Works studied will be by Achebe, Emecheta, Nhuhi, Dangarembga, Ata Aidoo, Ogot, and others. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or above. IIIA or IV

ENG 2134 American Writing of Nature
A study of the ways in which recent American writers represent nature and of the meaning and viability of an ecological culture. The course will allow students to become aware of how literature (essays, fiction, poetry) explores different ways of naming our relation to the land, to other life forms, and, of course, to other humans. Among the writers studied are Barry Lopez, Leslie Marmon Silko, Gary Snyder, and Denise Levertov. IV; V

ENG 2144 Women’s Literature
A survey of major issues in the study of women in literature, covering a representative sample of women writers. Questions will be raised about the nature and effects of patriarchal thinking on women and women writers, about the ways in which women’s problems emerge in women’s writing, and about the ways in which women writers image reality. Prerequisite: At least one ENG course. WS 1004 is recommended preparation. Also listed as WS 2144. IV; V

ENG 2154 American Women Writers and Ethnicity
A study of prose and poetry written by women in America: African-American, Asian, Chicana, American Indian, West and East Indian. The course will focus on questions raised about historicity, race, class, and gender, and the function of writing in addressing such social dynamics. Beyond this inquiry, the course will address issues related to compound identities and communities, class position and education, the construction of sexuality, the formation of collective ethnic or racial consciousness, and women’s communities. Writers may include Hurston, Larsen, Morrison, Kingston, Erdrich, Andalzua, Muhkerjee, and others. Also listed as WS 2154. IV; V

ENG 2164 Twentieth Century African American Literature
A study of African American writing that explores the portrayal of urban experience following the Great Migration. The class will read fiction, drama, and non-fiction narratives, listen to jazz, and watch films in order to examine how race, class, and gender shape life in American cities and how literary representation has changed historically. Writers may include Charles Chesnutt, Nella Larsen, Richard Wright, Ann Petry, Gwendolyn Brooks, Paule Marshall, Amiri Baraka, and Toni Morrison. IV

ENG 2174 Popular Fictions
An introduction to the critical study of popular culture. Texts will be selected from a variety of media (print, film, television, or comic books, etc.) so as to open questions of genre (detective, romance, or thriller, etc.). The critical contexts will provide students with the opportunity to investigate the cultural and political implications of popular forms and to consider the role of popular fiction in contemporary life. Media and genres considered may change from term to term. IV

ENG 2184 Literature of the American South
A study of selected fiction, poetry, drama, and nonfiction by Southern writers. The course will address ways in which these writers both reflect and create what come to be considered cultural realities about the region, the relationship between the history of the area and its literature, and the continued existence of the South as a distinctive region within the United States. Writers may include Jefferson, Poe, Twain, Chesnutt, Chopin, the Nashville Agrarians, Hurston, Faulkner, Tennessee Williams, O’Connor, Welty, Gaines, Walker, and Allison. IV; V

ENG 2284 South African Fiction, 1960-1994
A study of South African fiction written between 1960 and the first fully democratic elections of 1994. The course includes some of the key issues addressed by writers such as J.M. Coetzee, Nadine Gordimer, Bessie Head, Alex La Guma, and Njabulo Ndebele as they lived through the effects of apartheid. Guiding this exploration will be an awareness of developments in the new South Africa as it seeks to come to terms with the violence and racialism of its past. Inclusion of journalistic and video material will provide assistance in understanding the relevant historical and social contexts. IV

ENG 2294 Special Topics in Literature
Study of an author, period, or problem not fully treated in other English courses. Topics change from term to term and are announced in advance. May be repeated for credit. IV

ENG 2344 The Culture of Nature
A study of ways in which popular culture in the U.S. shapes assumptions about nature. The course provides students with a critical language designed to illuminate cultural products in a variety of media (print, film, television, etc.) as well as those aspects of daily life which communicate ideas of nature implicitly. This course will treat a range of topics in relation to environmental concern, including, for example, gender, wilderness, food, tourism, labor, and the sciences. IV

ENG 2374 Postmodern Literature
A study of literature after 1945 that reflects a postmodern consideration of language as a means to cultural criticism. The course will examine how writers, by focusing on language, experiment with form narrative, dramatic, and poetic. The literature embodies varieties of cultural criticism, including feminist and postcolonial; authors may include such writers as Donald Barthelme, Italo Calvino, Derek Walcott, Angela Carter, Salman Rushdie, J.M. Coetzee, and Caryl Phillips. IV; V

ENG 2474 Survey of British Literature I
A study of great British writers from the Anglo-Saxon period through the Restoration. Included are such figures as Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Milton, and Donne. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing, completion of one ENG Area II course, or permission of instructor. III B or IV; V

ENG 2484 Survey of British Literature II
A survey of important British literature from the mid-seventeenth century to the present that examines ways in which literary artists both adapted to and reproduced the cultural changes associated with modernity, while dealing with modernity’s evolving social and political circumstances. The course will explore a complex cultural tradition in its social context and will include such writers as Addison, Wollstonecraft, Wordsworth, Dickens, Hardy, Woolf, and Hughes. May be used to satisfy a distribution requirement in Western tradition. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing, completion of one English Area II course, or permission of instructor. III B or IV; V

ENG 2504 Studies in Film
Study of an auteur or group of auteurs, or of film genres, stylistic or historical questions not treated fully in Introduction to Film. Topics change from term to term and are announced in advance. May be repeated for credit if genre is different. IV; V

ENG 2514 Genre Film
This course will address the complex question of genre in cinema, investigating the ways in which narrative forms are infused with and transmit culturally specific mythic and ideological meanings. It will examine what constitutes cinematic genre in general, and then consider the developing histories of such genres as the Western, the gangster film, horror, science fiction, etc., as reflected by particular texts. IV

ENG 2534 Detective Fiction
A study of the generic dimensions and directions of detective fiction from Poe to the present. It will investigate the hold detective fiction has had on the popular imagination and the genre’s reinforcement or subversion of ideological assumptions. Writers and filmmakers may include Doyle, Sayers, Hammett, Chandler, Paretsky, Hillerman, Himes, Dmytryk, Huston, Polanski, and others. IV; V

ENG 2614 American Short Story Literature
A study of the genre of the short story as conceived and crafted by American writers. The course will consider the nature and history of the short story, its development in America, its early American practitioners and theorists, and how American short fiction reflects and comments on American life and culture. May include the work of Poe, Hawthorne, Wharton, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Baldwin, O’Connor, Paley, Oates, Lahiri, and others. IV

ENG 2624 American Gothic
A study of the genre of "American Gothic" fiction and how it evolves from the late 18th century through the early 21th century. The course will examine the origins of American Gothic fiction and the genre’s development at various periods and in different regions; it will also explore the sometimes painful birth of American literature and consider the continued fascination with what Herman Melville called the "power of blackness." IV

ENG 2654 Fictions of Identity in American Literature
A study of American literature in relation to the phenomenon of "passing," exploring the complex connections among race, gender, class, and power. The primary readings will be supported by an examination of legal essays, ethnographic studies, and films that develop a context for understanding how Americans culturally and legally defined as "black" took on "white" identity and how "passing" now extends to class, ethnic, and sexual identities. Writers may include James Weldon Johnson, Nella Larsen, William Faulkner, Americo Paredes, and Danzy Senna. IV

ENG 2674 Survey of American Literature Literature
An exploration of the social forces shaping American literature from 1492 to the present. We will consider how our literature chronicles the emergence of uniquely American voices and stories, and we will analyze the formation of a canon of "important" literature and the ways that canon has been challenged. Most importantly, we will keep asking how the literature of the United States simultaneously contests and reinforces the evolving cultural and political concerns of American culture.Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and completion of one English Area II course, or permission of instructor. IV

ENG 2714 Jane Austen and Film
Examines what Jane Austen’s novels and their film adaptations reveal about both Regency England and the contemporary world. The course explores the novels in their original cultural contexts and asks how these novels speak to the interests, desires, and problems of today’s culture. Students will read in detail four of Austen’s novels and discuss the efforts of twentieth-century filmmakers to capture, edit, and update Austen’s humor and wit for today’s audiences. Also listed as WS 2714. IV

ENG 2904 Literary Interpretation
Designed to ready students for upper-level work in literary study, this course will develop students’ understanding of the goals and methods of literary interpretation. Building on the training in formal analysis provided by introductory courses, it will guide students in considering literary texts in a variety of contexts. The course will also develop students’ skill in writing interpretive essays based on sound analysis. Required of English majors at the end of the sophomore year. Prerequisite: ENG 1074, 1134 or 1144 and sophomore standing in the English major. IV

ENG 3014 Special Topics in Literature
Advanced study of an author, period, or topic not fully treated in other English courses. Topics change from term to term and are announced in advance. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ENG 2904 or permission of instructor. IV

ENG 3024 Chaucer
A close reading of Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales and selected shorter works within the cultural context of fourteenth-century England. The seminar will examine literary, political, social, religious, and philosophical issues central to an understanding of Chaucer as both a reflection and a critique of his times and as someone who anticipates contemporary issues. Read in Middle English. IV; V

ENG 3174 Nineteenth-Century American Literature
A study of major writers focusing on the emergence of an American consciousness. Emphasis on Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, Crane, Dickinson, Whitman, and James. Standard or CR/NC grading. Prerequisite: ENG 2904 or permission of instructor. IV; V

ENG 3204 The Romantic Lyric
A study of the lyric as it was transformed by British Romantics into a vehicle for sustained introspection and psychological analysis. The course explores the ethical and political dimensions of these aesthetic developments and situates them within a history of revolutions, British, American, and French. Authors may include William Wordsworth, Coleridge, Blake, the Shelleys, Keats, and others. Prerequisite: ENG 2904 or permission of instructor. IV; V

ENG 3224 Romanticism and Liberty
The study of British Romantic writings consideration of liberty and its complicated significance in an evolving modern society. The course will note the culture of liberty inherited from earlier in the eighteenth century, its oppositional relation to cultures of aristocracy, patriarchy and slavery, and how Romantic writers asserted its value in the period of monarchic reaction that followed the French Revolution. Authors may include Equiano, Wollstonecraft, Byron, Percy Shelley, and others. Prerequisite: ENG 2904 or permission of instructor. IV; V

ENG 3234 Victorian Literature
A study of British literature from 1832 to the end of the century dealing with poetry and prose of such writers as Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, Dickens, Eliot, Ruskin, Hardy, and others. Standard or CR/NC grading. Prerequisite: ENG 2904 or permission of instructor. IV; V

ENG 3304 Seventeenth-Century British Literature
A study of major writers of the seventeenth century: Donne, Herbert, Marvell, Jonson, Milton, Bacon, Burton, Browne, Webster, Tourneur, Middleton, etc. Will emphasize intellectual and literary currents in the period as seen in selected prose and will examine trends in drama and lyric poetry after Shakespeare. Generic focus may vary from year to year. Standard or CR/NC grading. Prerequisite: ENG 2904 or permission of instructor. IV; V

ENG 3314 Renaissance Literature
A study of major writers of the Continental and English Renaissance: Erasmus, More, Castiglione, Sidney, Spenser, Marlowe, and other sixteenth-century poets and playwrights. Emphasis on intellectual and cultural backgrounds to the literature. Standard or CR/NC grading. Prerequisite: ENG 2904 or permission of instructor. IV; V

ENG 3324 Shakespeare I
An intensive study of 8-10 plays drawn from the first half of Shakespeare’s career, dealing with selected histories, comedies, and tragedies up to about 1600. Prerequisite: ENG 2904 or permission of instructor. Also listed as THEA 3324. IV; V

ENG 3334 Shakespeare II
An intensive study of at least 10 plays from the second half of Shakespeare’s career. Will deal with the problem comedies, mature tragedies, and tragicomedies. Prerequisite: ENG 2904 or permission of instructor. Also listed as THEA 3334. IV; V

ENG 3404 Early Twentieth-Century British Literature
A study of British literature from the turn of the century to World War II. Most of the course will be devoted to the development of Modernism, but predecessors and successors will also be considered. Writers such as Hardy, Shaw, Yeats, Joyce, Eliot, Lawrence, Rhys, and Woolf will be included. Prerequisite: ENG 2904 or permission of instructor. IV; V

ENG 3414 Twentieth-Century British Literature, Post-1945
A study of British literature written after World War II. The designation "British" will include not only authors born in England, but also authors from the former British colonies writing in English. Will explore the intersection of Modernism and Postmodernism, as well as the place of the written word in a world increasingly dominated by mass communication: radio, television, and the advertising image. Authors may include Greene, Lessing, Pinter, Barker, Murdoch, Stoppard, and Rushdie. Prerequisite: ENG 2904 or permission of instructor. IV; V

ENG 3504 The Eighteenth-Century British Novel
A study of the novel’s beginnings and rapid development in Britain, with special attention to such topics as the rise of literacy, the respectability of writing fiction, and special forms of the novel. Authors may include Defoe, Sterne, Fielding, Richardson, and Austen. Standard or CR/NC grading. Prerequisite: ENG 2904 or permission of instructor. IV; V

ENG 3514 The Nineteenth Century British Novel
A study of the major novelists of the nineteenth century. Though individual works may vary between offerings of the course, authors will include such writers as Scott, E. Bronte, Thackeray, Dickens, Eliot, and Hardy. Standard or CR/NC grading. Prerequisite: ENG 2904 or permission of instructor. I; V

ENG 3564 Milton
An intensive study of the most important poetry and selected prose of the major seventeenth-century British writer, focusing on Paradise Lost. Standard or CR/NC grading. Prerequisite: ENG 2904 or permission of instructor. IV; V

ENG 3664 Early Twentieth-Century American Literature
A study of North American literature from the turn of the century to World War II. Will include an examination of the Modernist movement and the Harlem Renaissance as well as the work of other influential authors. Reading may include works by Sherwood Anderson, Willa Cather, Kate Chopin, ee cummings, John Dos Passos, William Faulkner, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Charlotte Perkins-Gilman, Ezra Pound, Gertrude Stein, Wallace Stevens, and Richard Wright. Prerequisite: ENG 2904 or permission of instructor. IV; V

ENG 3674 Twentieth-Century American Literature, Post-1945
A study of North American literature from 1945 to the present, with special emphasis on the exploration of cultural issues in traditional, multicultural, and feminist literatures. Reading may include the works of Margaret Atwood, James Baldwin, Raymond Carver, Don DeLillo, Joan Didion, E. L. Doctorow, Ralph Ellison, Louise Erdrich, Maxine Hong Kingston, Toni Morrison, Flannery O’Connor, Thomas Pynchon, J. D. Salinger, Sam Shepard, Tennessee Williams, and George Wolfe. Prerequisite: ENG 2904 or permission of instructor. IV; V

ENG 4014 Independent Study
Readings on an approved topic, followed by the preparation of a critical paper. Repeatable once by special permission. Prerequisite: ENG 2904 or permission of instructor and grade point average of at least 3.0.

ENG 4144 Senior Creative Writing Project
Full-year independent study project in creative writing. Emphasis may be on poetry, fiction, or drama and will vary with student interest and availability of instructor. Student is expected to research the craft and produce an organized book-length manuscript. (1 or 2 course units.) Prerequisites: Senior standing, at least one term of ENG 2054, and permission of instructor. ENG 4144 is a prerequisite to 4154.

ENG 4154 Senior Creative Writing Project
Full-year independent study project in creative writing. Emphasis may be on poetry, fiction, or drama and will vary with student interest and availability of instructor. Student is expected to research the craft and produce an organized book-length manuscript. (1 or 2 course units.) Prerequisites: Senior standing, at least one term of ENG 2054, and permission of instructor. ENG 4144 is a prerequisite to 4154.

ENG 4204 Internship in English
The practical application of English skills in journalism, communications, advertising, and other areas. Students choose an appropriate organization in consultation with faculty sponsor. (1 or 2 course units.) CR/NC grading. Prerequisites: Junior standing in the major and permission of instructor. A total of 2 course units may be counted toward the major.

ENG 4208 Internship in English
The practical application of English skills in journalism, communications, advertising, and other areas. Students choose an appropriate organization in consultation with faculty sponsor. (1 or 2 course units.) CR/NC grading. Prerequisites: Junior standing in the major and permission of instructor. A total of 2 course units may be counted toward the major.

ENG 4504 Capstone Seminar
Designed to encourage students to engage more deeply with questions that arise from the study of literature, as well as provide occasion for students to reflect on work done throughout the major. It will, in addition, require that students complete an extended critical essay. Focal literary works will be drawn from a specific historical period and will change from term to term, depending upon the instructor. Required of all English majors in the winter of their senior year. Prerequisites: Completion of ENG 2904, three other period-requirement courses, and senior standing in the major. IV

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